A reception will be held 4-6 p.m., Tuesday, July 22 at The Evelyn Burrow Museum for the Regional Sculptors Invitational Exhibit. The reception is free and open to the public.

A reception will be held 4-6 p.m., Tuesday, July 22 at The Evelyn Burrow Museum for the Regional Sculptors Invitational Exhibit. The reception is free and open to the public.

 

HANCEVILLE, Ala. — The Evelyn Burrow Museum at Wallace State Community College will host a reception from 4 to 6 p.m., Tuesday, July 22, for the Regional Sculptors Invitational Exhibit. The exhibit opened July 1 and will continue through Sept. 30.

The exhibit features artwork provided by 17 artists from Alabama and Georgia. The artwork ranges from the whimsical to traditional pieces, including one piece that is motion activated as museum visitors pass by.

Artists in the exhibit include:

– Everett Cox of Huntsville

– Glenn Dasher of Hunstville

– Casey Downing Jr., of Mobile

– Jude Johnston (NovOntus) of Cullman

– Dale Lewis of Oneonta

– Christopher McNulty of Opelika

– Branko Medenica of Birmingham

– Ted Metz of Montevallo

– Scott Meyer of Montevallo

– Larry Millard of Athens, Ga.

– Brad Morton of Birmingham

– Nall of Alabama

– Robin Snyder of Birmingham

– Lee Somers of Montevallo

– Ted Whisenhunt of Young Harris, Ga., formerly of Birmingham

– Emily Williams of Columbus, Ga.

– Rachel Wright of Mobile

Among the most well known is Nall, who contributed two pieces of art created using found material recycled into the artwork. “Violin” is the musical instrument accented with vertebrae and turkey feet. “Swamp Sax” was created using a small saxophone, the head of a small alligator and other water-found objects.

Look toward the ceiling to see one of Everett Cox’s sculptures. The Huntsville artist’s “Chimera” sets high atop a pedestal. Nearby is Casey Downing Jr.’s bust of boxer Joe Lewis.  Step carefully around Glenn Dasher’s “Dada Vinci,” a motion-activated piece that will have the wings of the piece expanding or contracting.

You’ll also see glass pieces created by Rachel Wright and Emily Williams. Wright’s “Man in the Moon” pieces have special meaning to her as they are representative of her father, who worked on the Apollo missions and some of his cremains are used in the pieces.

“In the two weeks since the exhibit opened, we’ve had great response from the area,” said Donny Wilson, director of the Burrow Museum. “More than any exhibition we’ve hosted, this one invites conversations. Art is such a subjective format. While one piece may strike a chord with one viewer, another may not like it all. That dichotomy is one of the reasons art is so important to our lives. It creates great debate and brings people from all backgrounds together.”

Several of the artists plan to attend the Tuesday reception, which is free and open to the public. Those who are planning to attend include Dasher, Downing, Johnston, Lewis, Medenica, Metz, Morton, Snyder and Williams.

For more information about the exhibit or to schedule a group visit, call Wilson at 256.352.8457 or visit www.burrowmuseum.org.