HANCEVILLE, Ala. — Wallace State Community College in Hanceville recently hosted educators from other colleges participating in the BOOST (Better Occupational Outcomes with Simulation Training) EON Reality iBench training. Faculty from Wallace State-Selma and Midlands Technical College in Columbia, S.C., gathered with WSCC graphic developers and Patient Care Specialist faculty, pooling resources to create lessons for three-dimensional mobile computer workstations.

Faculty in their facilities and the three other colleges in the BOOST consortium can use the lessons. The gathering helped streamline the process of creating the lessons in a format all of the institutions can use and tailor them to their own needs to better benefit their students.

Karen Walton, Director of the Patient Care Specialist program at Wallace State, said the process lets instructors create a storyboard for their lesson plan, in which they tell the developers what they need on each page, what they want it to say and look like. Once the storyboard is created, other colleges in the consortium can upload that file and use it as is, or tweak it to fit their needs.

The three-day visit by the consortium members proved to be productive, with several 3-D lessons created in all manner of subjects. One instructor worked on a lesson of the muscular system that included a 3-D model of the human form covered in muscles and multiple choice questions relating to different muscles on the image.

Walton said they completed an entire chapter for an EKG class, which can be used not only for her Patient Care Specialists students, but for other students in various health programs at Wallace State.

Amanda LeeVan, the BOOST consortium’s instructional designer, was pleased with the results of their visit. With only three of the six colleges in the consortium having developers on staff, getting the developers together in one place to organize the process will be a benefit to all of the colleges.

Wallace State’s Patient Care Specialist program, created through Project BOOST, is a two-semester program that provides certifications as a Certified Nursing Assistant and Electrocardiography (EKG) Technician. For more information about the program, contact Karen Walton at 256.352.8198, boost@wallacestate.edu, or visit www.wallacestate.edu/pcs.

 

Faculty and staff from three member colleges in the BOOST consortium met last week at Wallace State Community College in Hanceville for EON Reality iBench training. Pictured from left are, in front, Felecia Pettway, WSCC-Selma; Susan Copeland, WSCC Hancevile; Amanda LeeVan, Midlands Tech; Lindsey Gyles, Midlands Tech; Lance Yoshioka, WSCC Hanceville; in back, Raford Nixon, WSCC-Selma; Mark Chebon, EON Instructor; Karen Walton, WSCC Hanceville; Monique Ford, WSCC Selma; Mary Medendorp, WSCC Hanceville; Mark Halpin, WSCC-Selma; and William Weaver, WSCC Hanceville.

Faculty and staff from three member colleges in the BOOST consortium met last week at Wallace State Community College in Hanceville for EON Reality iBench training. Pictured from left are, in front, Felecia Pettway, WSCC-Selma; Susan Copeland, WSCC Hancevile; Amanda LeeVan, Midlands Tech; Lindsey Gyles, Midlands Tech; Lance Yoshioka, WSCC Hanceville; in back, Raford Nixon, WSCC-Selma; Mark Chebon, EON Instructor; Karen Walton, WSCC Hanceville; Monique Ford, WSCC Selma; Mary Medendorp, WSCC Hanceville; Mark Halpin, WSCC-Selma; and William Weaver, WSCC Hanceville.

One of the lessons built by BOOST consortium members during recent training sessions at Wallace State Community College included this lesson for the muscular system featuring a series of multiple choice questions aimed at certain muscles pointed out on a three-dimensional mobile computer work station. The student is able to view different angles and muscle groups by rotating the image in the middle of the screen.

One of the lessons built by BOOST consortium members during recent training sessions at Wallace State Community College included this lesson for the muscular system featuring a series of multiple choice questions aimed at certain muscles pointed out on a three-dimensional mobile computer work station. The student is able to view different angles and muscle groups by rotating the image in the middle of the screen.